MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY RESIDENT ENJOYS MAKING HAY THE OLD FASHION WAY
A Project of TownCryer News
First Issue April 2007
Last Issue July 2016 
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ABOUT MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY

THINGS TO DO


    FESTIVALS
        Dean Maple Syrup Festival
        Halifax County Exhibition
        50 Mile Yard Sale
        Kirk Logan Fiddling Contest
        Rally in the Valley
        Christmas Festival of Trees
        Christmas Festival of Crafts

    ACTIVE ADVENTURES

    ARTS AND CULTURE

    FAMILY FUN

    HISTORIC SITES AND MUSEUMS

    REST AND RELAXATION

    THINGS TO DO FOR FREE!

OUR HUMMINGBIRD

HISTORY

    Musquodoboit Railway
    Memorial Hospital

AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

COMMUNITIES

MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY TOURISM

Our Historical Roots

At a time when many think the world is spiraling out of control, residents of Musquodoboit Valley are still enjoying a way of life that has been their history for more than 200 years.

Direct descendants of the original families that first settled Musquodoboit Valley in the late 1700s remain. Local residents take pride knowing they have carried forward the oral histories and traditions of their ancestors. In Musquodoboit Pioneers: A Record of Seventy Families: Their Homesteads and Genealogies (1780-1980), author Jenny Reid recounts detailed information about the settlement of Musquodoboit Valley.

The Musquodoboit River, along which the communities of Musquodoboit Valley first settled, is approximately 97 kilometres in length. It is one of the few rivers in central Nova Scotia that supports a healthy population of Atlantic sea trout and salmon. The river is also a popular recreational destination for canoeists and kayaking enthusiasts.




Markland Icelandic Settlement

In the mid 1800s, the Nova Scotia government lured immigrants from Iceland to settle here. Between 1875 and 1882, at Markland (near Caribou), Icelandic families tried to carve out a new life in the barren wilderness. Their stories have been captured and published by the Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia.

The history of the Icelanders is a little known piece of Nova Scotia's rich heritage. The Log Cabin at Markland tells the poignant story of these hard working settlers who struggled to eke out a living in the wilderness community of Markland from 1875 to 1882.

Members of the Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia, formed in 1998, recount their endeavours to bring this part of Nova Scotia's past to light. In their resolve to fulfill the dream of the founding Chair, Dolly Belmore, they take on the challenge of building a log cabin in the old settlement and Markland becomes a Nova Scotia tourist destination. The DVD, documenting this journey, is available exclusively through the Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia.


Moose River Gold Mines Disaster

Tragedy struck our Valley on Easter Sunday, April 12, 1936. The Moose River Gold Mines Disaster will always be remembered. Three men were trapped 150 feet below the earth’s surface for 10 days – only two survived. The Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission sent Frank Willis to the scene where he made the first live reports to 100 million listeners from the disaster location. It was North America's very first live broadcast from a disaster scene: forever changing the delivery of news. more >>


Musquodoboit Valley Cemetery Records

Through the efforts of many volunteers, family and community histories have been compiled and recorded to provide factual information to those searching their genealogy. As well, records of all the church cemeteries within Musquodoboit Valley are updated regularly and are available upon request by contacting the Musquodoboit Valley Tourism Association.


 

Musquodoboit Railway

Musquodoboit Valley Memorial Hospital

 

WADDYA KNOW...?

Some time in the 1930s, while fishing on one of the lakes in the Murchyville area, two men believed they caught sight of a treasure chest under the water’s surface. Research revealed that the British had attempted to intercept a French payroll intended for Louisburg during the 1700s. It is believed the French ducked in to a small harbour, unloaded the payroll and burnt their ship. Then, they came inland by following one of the established native routes, traveled the water courses to Musquodoboit Valley to hide the booty. The harbour where the ship was torched since became known as Ship Harbour.


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