LOG CABIN REPLICA AT SITE OF MARKLAND ICELANDIC SETTLEMENT 
A Project of TownCryer News
First Issue April 2007
Last Issue July 2016
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ABOUT MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY

THINGS TO DO


    FESTIVALS
        Dean Maple Syrup Festival
        Halifax County Exhibition
        50 Mile Yard Sale
        Kirk Logan Fiddling Contest
        Rally in the Valley
        Christmas Festival of Trees
        Christmas Festival of Crafts

    ACTIVE ADVENTURES

    ARTS AND CULTURE

    FAMILY FUN

    HISTORIC SITES AND MUSEUMS

    REST AND RELAXATION

    THINGS TO DO FOR FREE!

OUR HUMMINGBIRD

HISTORY

    Musquodoboit Railway
    Memorial Hospital

AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

COMMUNITIES

MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY TOURISM

 

Historic Sites and Museums

Moose River Gold Mines Museum and Provincial Park

On Easter Sunday, April 12, 1936 disaster struck the Moose River Gold Mines. Three men, Dr. D. Edwin Robertson, Alfred Scadding and Herman Magill, went into the mine to explore and were trapped 150 feet below the earth’s surface for 10 days – only two survived. (Magill didn’t survive the ordeal).

Frank Willis, of the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission made the first live reports to millions of listeners from the disaster scene.

Thanks to the dedication of community volunteers and the Musquodoboit Valley Tourism Association, a park and museum have been established to share this community’s history with visitors. The Moose River Gold Mines Museum provides detailed information about the 1936 disaster and has numerous artifacts on display illustrating the mining history in this area and Nova Scotia. The Museum is open during July and August.

Nearby, at the Moose River Gold Mines Provincial Park, there is a cairn erected in honour of the crew of draegermen from the Stellarton mines who had risked their lives to reach the entombed men. more info>>


Icelandic Settlement of Markland

In the mid 1800s, the Nova Scotia government lured immigrants from Iceland to settle here. Between 1875 and 1882 Markland, near Caribou, Icelandic families tried to carve out a new life in the barren wilderness.

Thanks to the effort of the Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia, their stories have been captured and published. In the decade since the Society began to uncover this little-known Icelandic community, foundations for most of the original homesteads have been located, pathways have been cleared to the site and have been marked with historical plaques both in Icelandic and English.

The Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia has published the English translation of a book written by one of the first settlers, entitled Markland-Remembrance of the Years 1875-1881. The Society also produced an educational film and a CD entitled: The Story of Markland.

A memorial cairn marks the entrance to the settlement. Built of rocks gathered from the 30 homesteads, it is topped with a rock shipped from Iceland. Members of the Icelandic Memorial Society of Nova Scotia took on the challenge of building a log cabin replica in the old settlement of Markland and produced The Log Cabin at Markland, a DVD, documenting this journey.
more >>

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EPA Flight 102 Memorial

The Handley Page Dart Herald: CF-NAF was owned by Eastern Provincial Airways and offered regular daily flights in the Atlantic region during the 1960s. On March 17, 1965, Flight 102 plummeted from the sky and crashed in a wooded area near Caribou within a few minutes after leaving Halifax International Airport en route to Sydney. It was later determined by Transport Canada the probable cause of the crash was corrosion along the bottom centre line of the aircraft that resulted in catastrophic structural failure.

Aboard the 44-seat plane were Cpt. Ray Murnaghan, Co-pilot, Ross Clements, Stewardess, Dorice Chevarie and passengers Arthur Blades, Gordon MacDonald, Harold Moore, Owen Embree and Henry Leidl. All passengers and crew died upon impact.

REMEMBERING 50 YEARS LATER

As someone who has an interest in plane crash histories, Daniel Goguen, of Moncton, N.B., dedicated countless days of his free time researching military and commercial crashes, mapping and marking their locations. The aviation archivist spent four years tracking down relatives of the Flight 102 disaster. He and the pilot's son, Norm Murnaghan, consulted with the public and other family survivors in 2013 to determine how best to remember the EPA crash.

On June 14, 2015 a service of remembrance was held at Holy Cross Catholic Church in Middle Musquodoboit. Afterwards, attendees traveled to the mouth of the crash site access road, along the Caribou Road where a monument was dedicated in memory of those who perished on Flight 102. It was in this area that an Upper Musquodoboit man and his son uncovered an emergency hatch door from Flight 102 while out hunting in the Fall of 2014. Although most of the wreckage that was strewn over a five-mile radius was recovered, it is believed there are still pieces remaining in the area.

 
Norm Murnaghan, son of EPA Flight 102 Captain Ray Murnaghan, dedicates the monument which depicts images of the crash victims, information about the plane, along with credit and appreciation to all businesses and individuals who supported its installation. Anyone interesting in learning more about EPA Flight 102 is asked to contact Norm Murnaghan at norm.murnaghan@gmail.com
 
 
The memorial site is located in Upper Musquodoboit approximately 6 kms up the Caribou Mines Road. 
 

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Cemetery Records

Cemetery records are available for Old Pioneer Cemetery, Hillside Cemetery, and Riverside Cemetery at Middle Musquodoboit Pastoral Charge web site.

Dean Cemetery

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WADDYA KNOW...?

Locals enjoy telling visitors a story of how Musquodoboit got its name. According to legend, a man was riding his horse named Dobit, and had to cross the river. The horse balked and refused to cross the water. The rider insisted and yet, the horse refused. In frustration, the rider said, “We’re late. Mus-go-dobit!” 


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