THE UPPER PART OF MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY COMPRISES THE LARGEST FARMING DISTRICT IN HRM
A Project of TownCryer News
First Issue April 2007
Last Issue July 2016
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ABOUT MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY

THINGS TO DO


    FESTIVALS
        Dean Maple Syrup Festival
        Halifax County Exhibition
        50 Mile Yard Sale
        Kirk Logan Fiddling Contest
        Rally in the Valley
        Christmas Festival of Trees
        Christmas Festival of Crafts

    ACTIVE ADVENTURES

    ARTS AND CULTURE

    FAMILY FUN

    HISTORIC SITES AND MUSEUMS

    REST AND RELAXATION

    THINGS TO DO FOR FREE!

OUR HUMMINGBIRD

HISTORY

    Musquodoboit Railway
    Memorial Hospital

AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

COMMUNITIES

MUSQUODOBOIT VALLEY TOURISM

 

Agriculture and Industry

Anyone who visits Musquodoboit Valley is reminded of simpler times. Our agricultural and forest industries are our mainstays. At one time, small family farms were the norm throughout the Valley. Today, multi-million dollar operations have replaced them. In recent years, beef growers and dairy farmers have had to adjust to an ever changing consumer driven market. The upper part of Musquodoboit Valley comprises the largest farming district in the Halifax Regional Municipality


Locally Produced  and Locally Grown

The 100-Mile Diet and the promotion of locally produced, organically grown products may be new concepts to many people.

But, we here in Musquodoboit Valley have always appreciated the origin of our food.

From our fields and back yard gardens to your dining table, pick up local produce at the following Farmers Markets:


Tree Harvesting and Forest Management

Tree harvesting and forest management have provided work for generations of locals. Like farming, the small portable mills that used to exist here have been replaced with high tech wood harvesting machinery. Able to adjust to the global market, mills have changed to meet today’s demands. 

Upper Musquodoboit was once home to the largest lumber mill east of Quebec. Since, the mill has been dismantled but the production and distribution of wood pellets continues.

 


Mining Operations

Musquodoboit Valley has a rich history of gold mining. 

In 1936, Moose River Gold Mines made international news when three men were trapped underground for ten days. Rescuers from all over came to work on the recovery. 

Their efforts were rewarded when two miners were successfully brought to safety. Regrettably, the third succumbed to pneumonia only two days before.

Since 1945, a limestone mine in Upper Musquodoboit has mined, processed, and sold limestone products in Nova Scotia and Atlantic Canada, and in 1956, was the largest commercial enterprise in Upper Musquodoboit. Today, products include pelletized limestone, powdered limestone, granular limestone, powdered gypsum, pelletized gypsum, and traction sand.

In the early 20th century, the raw stone was transported by train from Upper Musquodoboit to the docks yards in Dartmouth and Halifax. Today, trucks have taken over and haul the limestone to a nearby dock in Sheet Harbour.

Over the years, exploration for kaolin, gypsum, zinc and limestone have continued. Rich deposits of each have been found in Musquodoboit Valley. Front page headlines in our provincial paper announced to the world of the mining opportunities that exist here.


Small Businesses Flourish in Musquodoboit Valley

With access to high-speed Internet, a number of small businesses and entrepreneurs have blossomed on to the scene in recent years. People living here remember what it’s like to be self-sufficient. It’s this work ethic that enables us to ensure we have a strong local economy. 


Learn More About Rural Nova Scotia

Musquodoboit Valley hosts several popular events throughout the year

that offer people the opportunity to learn more about life in rural Nova Scotia. 

One of the oldest agricultural fairs in the province, the Halifax County Exhibition, is held the third week of every August. This fair is an opportunity to learn about and appreciate all those dedicated people who work the land to produce quality, wholesome food for consumers.

The public is encouraged to ask questions, participate in the activities, and learn more about life in rural Nova Scotia.

 

 

 

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  WADDYA KNOW...?

In 1926, Betsy Wylie, an Ayreshire cow owned by Samuel Crockett of Brookvale, held the world record for the production of milk and butterfat. In 1930, Mr. Crockett was declared the Banner Farmer for Halifax County and Betsy entered the Agricultural Hall of Fame.


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